Posts Tagged With: rubus trivialis

Bayou Sauvage NWR and Fort Pike SHS, Louisiana: Spring Flowers in Bloom

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Recently I made a spring jaunt over to southeast Louisiana to visit the Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike State Historic Site ($4 and no pets allowed in fort). My husband and I only saw a couple of alligators, from far away (see photo above).

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Below are images of a few flowering plants and a few critters I saw throughout the day. The first image is a member of the Rubus genus, commonly known as dewberry (Rubus trivialis). The fruit were advancing quite well.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

At the Bayou Sauvage we made three different entrance stops. Each area had its own unique attribute, whether a good spot for setting in a kayak, outstanding birding, or a a lengthy boardwalk that traversed a unique ecosystem of the Gulf Coast. I had not been to Bayou Sauvage since Hurricane Katrina, in fact I hadn’t been since spring of 1998, long before I ever thought I’d live on the MS Gulf Coast. We were so happy that leashed dogs were allowed. Our pups had a great time and will be back.

Realizing that most folks will find thistle nasty or hideous, please take a second look. Its gorgeous. In fact it nearly looks like something out of a horror movie or space novel.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Just a few steps away, this thistle plant had a different look, but still very pretty. So much detail and texture. Wildflower.org reports that these thistles are important to both native and bumble bees. You might now believe how many thistles there are just in the Cirsium genus alone! I thought perhaps at first the image below might be C. horridulum, but I am not positive. Actually, I really wanted to include that species name. HORRIDulum. LOL Exactly what I can image some tiny lady saying a long, long time ago: (Hmm HORRID plant). Next to this group of thistle were flowering Salix (willow) and you can see the pretty yellow flowers in the slideshow below.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

 

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

After our first Bayou Sauvage stop, we then drove to Fort Pike. The day was mostly cloudy and cool and it seemed we fought rain off and on all day. The sign below sits outside the tiny visitor center where admission is paid.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

This view of white-flowered crow poison (Northoscordum bivalve) is from the top of Fort Pike overlooking the water.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

A low growing groundcover,  Anagallis arvensis (scarlet pimpernel) was flowering atop the fort in the grass. Don’t be fooled by the mixture of species when you view the leaves. Yeah, fooled me too! The orange petals with inner purple marking is very distinctive. I had never seen this plant before. I am really glad I got to know this flower because the name Scarlet Pimpernel has been very familiar to me as a novel, play, and movie, although I confess that I don’t think I have ever read or viewed it.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Technically this next image of a fern isn’t “flowering”, but I am sometimes just amused at the cracks and crevices that plants will grow in when they put their minds to it.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

The Fort was really cool and I was glad to get to see it. The Gulf Coast sports many wonderful, historic forts so be sure to look them up if you are in the area.

Next we headed back for our second and final stops at the Bayou Sauvage, both of which had boardwalks that afford opportunities to see and photograph alligators, waterfowl and other aquatic birds and animals.

At several places we noticed the pretty blue flowers of Tradescantia, the native spiderwort. We weren’t the only ones to take note though (see image in slideshow of butterfly on Tradescantia)

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

Visit to Bayou Sauvage and Fort Pike, Louisiana.

View these images and more in the slideshow below:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Thank you Louisiana Fish and Wildlife Service (and for allowing Bayou Sauvage to be leashed-dog friendly) and the State of Louisiana Historic Sites.

Keep on Growin’
The Garden Maiden

All images and text copyright 2014 The Garden Maiden

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Categories: National & State Parks, What's Blooming | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blooming in My Yard: March 15-21, 2014

What's Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

What’s Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

This week I have seven flowers to share with you from what is blooming in my Mississippi yard.  The first is the image above of the iris growing at the base of an oak tree. I was so excited to see them open on Thursday. They have a very soft fragrance and really thrive at the base of the tree.  These iris were already growing there when I moved to the house. I have no idea which variety, but to me it doesn’t matter as much as just having them here as I left about seven different varieties of iris at my previous home in Oklahoma, most of which it seems were destroyed by the new homeowners, I was sad to see.

What's Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

What’s Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

The second image  is a very old apple tree, with just a small bit of life left in its tired old bones.  I cannot bring myself to cut it down, but I have planted a fig near the base with the hopes that it will be able to take over and replace the apple tree when it finally gives up the ghost. Its always good to plant for the future.

What's Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

What’s Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

A member of the Rosaceae family just like the apple tree above, these dewberries are flowering prolifically around my yard (sometimes to my dismay) and along roadsides throughout the region.  One can often find members of the same plant family blooming at the same time.  Dewberries produce edible fruit if you can get them before the birds or other animals. Growing along the ground, they make for easy pickens. Dewberries, Rubus trivialis, are native plants. Read more about dewberries on Wildflower.org.

What's Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

What’s Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

Dianthus, pinks, are beginning to flower. This winter they only rested from flowering for about six weeks, though the past two winters, they produced a bloom or two all winter. Growing in a half-whiskey barrel, these hardy gems are easy to grow and trouble-free. I deadhead them throughout the year to keep them flowering. The only trouble I have had with this planting were fireants that made their home in the pot. I have treated them successfully with fireant powder once per year. Fireants and poison ivy…two garden pests I despise and treat.

What's Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

What’s Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

The following three plants are natives that you may be missing in your lawn or garden if you apply herbicides and/or grow a monocultured lawn. The image above is known as lyreleaf sage or cancer weed, a member of the Lamiaceae family (mint, henbit and dead nettle family), one of my favorites for spring. Grab your hand lens and observe the tiny flowers closely. The family for these plants is also referred to sometimes as labiate due to the flower structure (2-lipped). They are magnificent and typical of the family. A native perennial, Salvia lyrata, makes a nice groundcover! Are you familiar with the groundcover called ajuga? Well, this has a very similar growth habit because they are in the same family! Wildflower.org reports this to be a good plant for butterflies and hummingbirds. As with most members of the mint family, there are many herbal medicinal references for Salvia lyrata if you search the web.

What's Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

What’s Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

Why I am nearly positive the plant above is Erigeron quercifolius (oakleaf fleabane), I can tell you for certain it is a member of the Asteraceae family. The leaf shape is distinctive which is why I believe it to be E. quercifiolius, and not one of the other Mississippi native Erigeron species. This plant grows in partial shade near the plant above, close to a sidewalk. After flowering I will go ahead and mow them down. Wildflower.org reports this plant to be a host for beneficial insects.  Another good reason NOT to spray herbicides on your lawn to create some fakey “perfect” portrait of what someone has told you a lawn should look like.

What's Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

What’s Blooming in My Yard. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2014_RStafne-109_WEB

My final flower for the week is a member of the Liliaceae family (a monocot).  Pictured above, Nothoscordum bivalve (as known as Allium bivalve) is commonly known as false garlic or crow poison. This dainty, perennial bulb can be found popping up in lawns or along roadsides. It is a native plant for Mississippi. I mow around these little guys until they are finished flowering.

When keying out plants, having a great resource is invaluable. Although I have not yet found a printed key for Mississippi, I can usually get to the “family” using my KEYS TO THE FLORA OF ARKANSAS. This book was written by one of my professors at the University of Arkansas, Dr. Edwin B. Smith. Additional resources for Mississippi native or wildflower identification can be found on USWildflowers.com (or your state).

If you happen to find an error in plant identification, let me know. I do try to verify all plants and plant names with at least three sources, but mistakes happen.  I love to learn if you know something I’ve missed.

Another day of planting awaits! I put together a few more raised beds yesterday and need to get them planted today. Rain comin’ on Sunday! Happy SPRING ya’ll!

Keep on Growin’
The Garden Maiden

All images and text copyright 2014 The Garden Maiden

Categories: What's Blooming | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment
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