Other Inspirations

The Importance of Staying Active in the American Society for Horticultural Science and ASHS Southern Region

The Importance of Staying Active in the American Society for Horticultural Science and ASHS Southern Region

I originally presented this as an invited fifteen minute talk to graduate students at the American Society for Horticultural Science Southern Region Conference in Jacksonville last week.  Oftentimes graduate students find it difficult to justify paying for professional memberships to attend conferences post-graduation, especially when some of those monies come directly from your own pocket. Its easy to fall into the thinking that, well, I attended as a graduate student to compete because my Adviser made me.  As a returning graduate student, one may find themselves with one to five years of opportunities to attend professional horticulture conferences beyond their initial experience. This is especially true for Master’s students moving on to their PhD.  So, as a graduate student, you might ask, what’s it in for me? Here are some notes.

  1. Student Member
    1. Professional research organization listing for CVs (professional resume), social media, applications for graduate school and jobs. (…is a Member of ASHS and ASHS Southern Region…for example)
    2. Discounted conference registration (hey we can all use  little break, and Members get one!)
    3. Student travel grants (my husband and I were both fortunate enough to receive these as graduate students)
    4. Paid to assist Dr. David Reed at SR registration desk (yes, even smaller opportunities such as this exist and I was able to assist Dr. Reed one year which helped pay for my costs)
    5. ASHS online resources: jobs, assistantships, journals (Members receive an early email notice of new positions!)
    6. Practice Oral and Written Communications in a professional setting at conferences (practice makes perfect and these are two essential skills you will need in the future)
    7. Source for peer-reviewed journal publication opportunities
      1. Take advantage of publishing at least one or two articles plus abstracts from your graduate research for each graduate degree, before leaving the University (trust me, it is much easier to do this while you are still on campus)
    8. Networking (some say it isn’t what you know, but who you know-this can be very true!)
    9. Early Notice of Job Opportunities
      1. In person at conferences & online (you’d be surprised of tidbits of juicy news for upcoming opportunities that may present themselves if you network!)
    10. Post CV online at ASHS (you have to put yourself out there on the most reputable sites for potential employers to find you…for horticulturists…look no farther than ASHS)
    11. Assistantship/Scholarship opportunities (I’ve got my mind on my money and my money on mind…let’s face it…those departmental potluck dinners are only going to get you so far and graduate school can be expensive)
    12. Letters of Recommendation (you’ll need both solid letters of recommendation from professionals who know you and your work, as well as professional experiences from which they can write glorious letters on your behalf)
    13. PAX Photography contest at ASHS (photography skills will help you in promoting and disseminating information about your research as a student and as a future employee…improve your skills and have a little fun with your peers in this contest-I have been!)
    14. Mentoring
      1. graduate student/faculty  (these mentors should guide you through the thesis/dissertation process, getting published, becoming active professionally, and making that student to employee transition) (if your own adviser isn’t up to par, seek out positive, active mentors from professionals at ASHS)
      2. peer-to-peer (fellow graduate students you meet in ASHS can be life long friends, supportive colleagues, and may provide you with helpful tips from their own experiences)
    15. ASHS SR-smaller, more family-like
      1. Not every US region has ASHS representation (that means that for those who can be intimidated by the larger ASHS conferences, Southern Region -for example- is smaller, close-knit group to interact with)
  1. Faculty/Employee/Employer Member (think to your future, graduate students!)
    1. Professional research organization listing for bios and bylines (social media, articles, speaking engagements, websites) *Your credentials!
    2. Discounted conference registration versus non-members
    3. ASHS SR-smaller, more family-like
      1. Not every US region has ASHS representation
    4. Awards/Recognitions (I received a Blue Ribbon Extension Communications Award…CV building!)
    5. International Research Opportunities
    6. Colleagues that lift each other up
    7. Mentoring: new faculty members
    8. Collaborative Research (this is extremely important)
      1. Institution to Institution
      2. Grants (multi-organizations)
    9. CV building (ASHS provides opportunities through presentations, awards, and volunteerism to build your CV)
      1. Annual evaluations
      2. Promotions
    10. Networking
    11. Early Notice of Job Opportunities
      1. In person at conferences & online
    12. Post CV online ASHS (not many professionals stay with the same company (or at the same location) forever-those days are gone…for some this is THE way to get significant promotions and increases in salary)
    13. Nominations Awards/Committees (I have served on several committees and have also volunteered to be a poster and oral competitions judge…all rewarding experiences)
    14. Letters of Recommendation (I have been a letter writer and received letters for/from folks via ASHS)
      1. Promotions
      2. Awards
    15. PAX Photography contest at ASHS
    16. Connect with students for Assistantship, Post-Grad, and Faculty Exchange research positions
    17. International speaking opportunities
    18. Disseminate Research Activities: Oral and Poster
    19. Promotes Personal Research, Department/Organization, Field of Study
    20. Annual Giving: Endowment, Scholarships, Awards
    21. Continuing Education Units (CEU’s) for certification programs such as the International Society for Arboriculture and the ASHS Certified Professional Horticulturist programs and some jobs
    22. Opportunities to Serve and Give Back
      1. Office Board & committees
      2. Judging Oral and Poster Competitions
      3. Advisors for ACB
    23. Publication opportunities in peer-reviewed journals
    24. Reasons to be an active Member though not employed directly in Horticulture Science as Scientist at the PhD level?
      1. Educational opportunities, collaboration and interest groups
        1. Stay apprised of what is new in horticulture
      2. Extension, Industry, Ag/Hort/Garden writers & communicators, Ag Education, Public Gardens
        1. We are stronger when we are together! Get inspired.
      3. May be in temporary position, not in Horticulture, but maintaining horticulture track/interests (I used to joke I was longest running ASHS Member who was not actively employed in Horticulture for many years!)

I hope this information can help you or a graduate student you may know in Horticulture or a horticulture-related field.

Yours in Gardening,

The Garden Maiden

 

copyright 2018 The Garden Maiden

http://thegardenmaiden.com

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Aloha to Latitude 29: Tiki Inspiration for Backyard Patios and Luaus

Latitude 29 tiki bar and restaurant in the French Quarter. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2015_RStafne

Latitude 29 tiki bar and restaurant in the French Quarter. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2015_RStafne

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yesterday I had the fortune of checking out the new tiki cocktail restaurant and bar in the French Quarter, New Orleans. My husband and I have been waiting forever for Jeff “Beachbum” Berry’s place (Latitude 29) to open, which it did in November.  Now, some of you may be wondering what in the world a tiki bar has to do with my gardening blog, so hold on to your seats as I try to weave a story for you.

Latitude 29 tiki bar and restaurant in the French Quarter. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2015_RStafne

Latitude 29 tiki bar and restaurant in the French Quarter. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2015_RStafne

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For many years I have been getting into tiki culture. It began as a sideshoot interest from being both a parrothead and a big fan of Hawaiiana and Hawaiian travel.  That led to a great interest in Exotica music (both retro and modern), surf music, and Hawaiian traditional music. On and on into 1960’s backyard tiki culture and home tiki bars my love went. Everything from the furniture, colors, and fabrics used then to the renaissance and popularity of the retro MOD look. Antique and modern tiki artists found their way into my home, and especially the use of bamboo furniture.

My husband and I hosted our first tiki party in Fayetteville, Arkansas many years ago and carried that love of mainland Aloha everywhere we went.

One of the main motivators of this retro culture was the desire to bring a bit of Hawaii to the home for those who were not lucky enough to travel to Hawaii or to return to Hawaii as often as they liked.

Latitude 29 tiki bar and restaurant in the French Quarter. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2015_RStafne

Latitude 29 tiki bar and restaurant in the French Quarter. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2015_RStafne

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It didn’t hurt my interests that I became completely mesmerized with everything Disney, especially The Enchanted Tiki Room. A visit to the attraction at either Disneyland or Disney World was more a of note -taking session in how to bring that “look” home.

One aspect of trying to keep tiki alive is creating a tropical-looking landscape or garden. Whether hiding tikis among the foliage of herbaceous perennials, or tucking cold-hardy palms among the cannas and castor beans. I even brought back Plumeria (frangipanis) from two trips to Hawaii and gladly move them in and out  of the house each fall/spring.

In addition to this, my husband and I began a great interest in classic, fresh, cocktail mixing. Fortunately a great history of tiki cocktails can be found in Beachbum Berry’s book, Potions of the Caribbean. Together, my husband and I wrote an article for State-by-State Gardening Magazine on the cocktail garden, back in May 2013 called Shaken or Stirred?

I am also a huge fan of Texas author James Michener and have read many of his books including Hawaii, Caribbean, Tales of the South Pacific and Return to Paradise.

At any rate, whenever given the chance, we seek out any remaining tiki culture (such as the Mai Kai in Fort Lauderdale) or new tiki. That brought us to Latitude 29.

Latitude 29 tiki bar and restaurant in the French Quarter. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2015_RStafne

Latitude 29 tiki bar and restaurant in the French Quarter. TheGardenMaiden_copyright_2015_RStafne

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It did not disappoint.

The food was great, the cocktails tasty and refreshing (we prefer to sit at the bar and chat up the mixologists), and the ambiance is SPOT ON with a fab music playlist by “Mrs. Bum”, who is as delightful as you could want in a tiki hostess.

We sampled the following drinks: Paniolo, Latitude 29, Nui Nui, Espresso Bongo, Lapu Lapu and an after dinner coffee drink. We also sampled the Noodle Bowl, Ground Filet Hamburger, Taro Fries, Crispy Sesame Green Beans and for desert the chocolate won tons. Tip: if you are on a low sodium diet as we are, request the fries and beans to be unsalted as they come with sea salt.

Check out the photos I captured with my old school “stupid phone”. They leave a bit to the imagination, but that’s what should pull you to pop in and let the tiki culture take you away to the South Pacific or other exotic Caribbean locale!

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Start planning now in these bleak days of winter how to bring some aloha spirit to your landscape or garden! After all inspiration could be as close as your nearest tiki bar!

 

Mahalo for stopping by!

The Garden Maiden 🙂

All images and text copyright 2015 The Garden Maiden

Categories: Other Inspirations | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment
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