What’s Blooming

The Garden Carnage of Monday Morning Shark Week

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Pulling these from my Twitter feed for Monday morning July 23, 2018:

So here it is Monday morning when a melancholy stroll through the garden is interrupted by #SharkWeek Sharks eating chive flowers, bat face cuphea, sharks swimming thru the lawn.

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I tried to run from #SharkWeek sharks in my garden, but they were everywhere. Sharks eating organically grown cucumbers (Sumter), green Paul Robeson tomatoes, and attacking my scarecrow.

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Unbelievably, #SharkWeek sharks even attacked my garden fish sculpture and my defenseless garden gnome. Pure garden carnage. What a Monday morning!

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With all the #SharkWeek garden carnage this Monday morning, even the Rudbeckia in my pollinator garden was not safe. Though, in the shark’s defense, it did look tasty.

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After witnessing all that, I went back inside for some online education in photography, water gardens and pollinators as part of some courses I am enrolled in.

Later I needed to take the dogs out to go potty. Just when I think it is safe to go back out into the garden, #SharkWeek sneak attack at the mailbox on my Passiflora vine as I reach for my mail.  The flower just opened today. Died so young.

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Beware of lawn sharks and teach your garden gnomes self-defense.

Yours in #SharkWeek gardening,

The Garden Maiden

All images and text copyright 2018 The Garden Maiden

 

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Categories: Crazy Plant Things I See, Observations from My Garden of Goods & Evils, Vegetable Crops, What's Blooming | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Adding and Certifying Pollinator, Wildlife, Butterfly Gardens

 

 

Have you heard about the Million Pollinator Gardens initiative? I just added mine to their map yesterday. If you have a pollinator garden of any size, won’t you consider adding your’s to this great cause?

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I have been working on three pollinator flower bed areas for a couple of years. Being sure to include water sources. I use flowering vines such as Passiflora, native shrubs, fruit (blueberry, kumquat, pomegranite, raspberry, blackberry, and hopefully soon fruit from grape and muscadine), herbs, and annuals and perennials (native and non-native). Some plants work, some struggle and some do not survive. But it is all fun and for a great cause.

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I recently re-hung a bat house the squirrels had worked over in a terrible way. A bee “hotel” is my newest addition.

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The USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service has some good pollinator garden/habitat information. Remember, you are providing food, shelter and water. The type needed will change depending on the life stage of the particular organism you are hoping to attract.

Other ways you can make your friendly garden official is to certify it through programs such as the National Wildlife Federation’s Certified Wildlife Habitat (they have a $10 off bonus during Pollinator Week, just check out their website for details and the code) and North American Butterfly Association’s Certified Butterfly Garden programs. I have done both of these. The signage you are able to purchase once you have a paid certification is attractive and educational and looks swell placed into your landscape/garden.

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Yours in Gardening,

The Garden Maiden

 

All images and text copyright 2018 The Garden Maiden

 

 

Categories: Observations from My Garden of Goods & Evils, What's Blooming | Tags: , , , , , ,

I Like Big Blooms!

A few of my favorite big bloomers from my own garden: Below Clerodendrum bungei

And now for something completely different: a bit of parody from one of my favorite dance songs of the 90’s: Baby Got Back by Sir Mix-a-lot. That song has been stuck in my head on repeat since 1992 and comes out at the oddest moments.  Last year was the song’s 25th year anniversary and it was featured on NPR. My parody lyrics below.

…”Oh, my God, Becky, look at her flowers, they are so big, I can’t believe they’re just so round…I like Big Blooms and I cannot lie, you other gardeners can’t deny. When a flower opens up and it’s as big as a plate, get your camera, do not wait! …I’m hooked and I can’t stop starin’… Oh flower, I wanna get wit ya and take ya picture…Other gardeners tried to warn me, but those flowers you got makes me so…HAPPY!” 2017 The Garden Maiden.

Newly added to my garden last summer, Confederate rose (Hibiscus mutabilis) is an old fashioned Southern garden staple.  I was surprised to find out one day that the blossoms change color from whitish pink to deep pink by evening.  I admired it in the morning, left for work, came home, looked across the yard and was like, WTH Dude?

Daylillies may be common, but their flowers are an uncommon delight.

I think I finally have enough moonflower seed saved to last me for many years.   I love to marvel at the flowers that open in late afternoon and fade by the next morning, adding drama to the evening garden.

Finally, and by no means is this the end of my favorite big bloomers, in my own yard or otherwise, however, this is a personal favorite…Aristolochia gigantea. I was first introduced to this plant while living in Hobe Sound, Florida (thank you previous renter).  I have also grown this vine in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and now in Mississippi. Previously I have grown the larger (yes, folks, even larger) flowering variety: Brasiliensis  There are some tropicals I don’t mind fussing over to bring indoors.  This is one.

Check out my Big Blooms board on Pinterest

Yours in Gardening,

 

The Garden Maiden

copyright 2018 The Garden Maiden

 

 

 

 

Categories: Observations from My Garden of Goods & Evils, What's Blooming | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
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