Posts Tagged With: mississippi

Early Spring Walk at Sandhill Crane NWR in Gautier, Mississippi

 

For the first time in a year or more, I was able to spend a couple of hours at the Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge in Gautier, Mississippi.

I’ve been going there for six or seven years. They have a wonderful visitor center with educational displays and a gift shop. Hubby bought me a new pair of earrings from Jabebo. I love their recycled earrings and own several. The site has some areas for picnics too.

On this day, a viewing platform was located out behind the visitor center to enable guests to view several of the Sandhill Cranes were are being acclimated to their new home. Unbelievably, it was my first time to actually see any of the cranes at the refuge. Unfortunately, it was too far for me to photograph, even with a telephoto lens.

It was a lovely day to take a hike on the trail which winds through the pine savanna.  Longleaf pine savannas are endangered ecosystems and harbor many wonderful native plants and provide habitat for countless wildlife species.

We have hiked the trail at this location many times with our dachshunds, but not since losing our male last summer to cancer.

Our female was not feeling up to the walk and she preferred to ride in her backpack. Heck, at nearly 17 years old, she is certainly entitled to off days.

I always appreciate signage of the plant material. Identified here is rattlesnake master. I love that name!

Notice the different colors of the carnivorous, pitcher plant flower heads!

The pitcher plants were showing well-formed flower heads that will soon open.

Many dried flowers were to be found. Some with interesting character that would be beautiful in dried arrangements.

Chaptalia tomentosa (wooly sunbonnets) were in full bloom.

 

 

Parrot pitcher plants, sundews, and other carnivorous plants were to be found. I think parrot pitcher plants are my favorite. They look like little parrots laid over in the grass. They have ten carnivorous species in their refuge.

Be sure to walk slowly and look closely so you don’t miss the tiny sundews!

As a horticulturist working for a blueberry breeder, I also enjoy observing the native Vaccinium species when we are hiking.

Again, thanks for the signage!

Could anything be cuter than a root named candy? Orange candyroot/milkwort flowering here: Polygala lutea

Even the simple, delicate coastal violet gets a sign!

I think this is a southern fence lizard?

The native longleaf pine has giant pine cones.

 

“In the wild Mississippi sandhill cranes can only be found on and adjacent to the Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR. There are only about 100 individuals remaining.” Stop by if you are even along the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Check out their calendar of events or sign up on their email list to stay up to date with future programs.

 

The Garden Maiden

All text and images copyright 2019 The Garden Maiden

@thegardenmaiden

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Categories: National & State Parks, What's Blooming | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Do You Know the Muffin Man? New Mississippi Blueberry

Early last week I was out in the blueberry plots at one of the research stations collecting samples. I was instantly enamored, if not surprised, by the outstanding pink ambiance given off by a few large blueberry bushes.

Muffin Man blueberry

 

I was not out to collect from this selection, but I was drawn to it. This blueberry was without a doubt the most gorgeous in the entire field.

 

PINK! So much pink. Pink flowers, pink buds, pink calyx, warm pink hues on the stems, pink color on the new, emerging leaves. Perfect for Valentine’s Day. As you can well imagine, I meant to do this post last week on Valentine’s Day, but time got away from me.

 

As a horticulturist with a background in ornamentals first, I was impressed with the idea of what a wonderful edible hedge this would make in someone’s yard. Not to mention that at this time of year, when things are just beginning to get going in south Mississippi, it makes a grand ornamental entrance into the landscape.

 

This blueberry was recently released as ‘Muffin Man’ from the Southern Horticultural Research Laboratory in Poplarville, MS. You can read a bit about it on this USDA ARS page. Members of the American Society for Horticultural Science who subscribe to the Hort Science Journal can also read more about this blueberry in Volume 53 issue 10

To promote fruiting, you’ll need a pollinator, rabbiteye blueberry that also flowers early. In ornamental design, I would suggest planting a smaller, early flowering, rabbiteye blueberry behind the hedge, or flanking the ends, so that ‘Muffin Man’ in all its glory is not obstructed.

If you are looking for the perfect Valentine’s gift for next year inquire, then do as this little honey bee did, seek out, and find ‘Muffin Man’ to give to your sweetheart.

 

 

Congratulations to the team for traditional, old fashioned plant breeding!

What does this mean, traditional plant breeding? Select potted blueberry plants are brought into the greenhouse in winter and “crossing” begins by a biological science technician when flowers open. That is to say the pollen (collected from the anthers of the male part) of one desired flower is used to fertilize the stigma (the sticky end of the female reproductive part) of another desired blueberry flower.  This takes quick work to be sure that no insects happen to be pollinating the flowers in the greenhouse and the greenhouse is checked almost daily. Fertilized flowers are protected while the fertilized flowers develop blueberry fruit, and after fruit set and maturity, the fruit are collected, cut open, and the seed harvested and stored in refrigeration. In summer, seed are planted out in trays in the greenhouse. When seedlings reach several inches tall, they are transplanted into individual peat pots. Those little babies are nurtured in the greenhouse and the following spring/early summer, they are planted out into field plots (generally by this time they are 12-24″ tall). The young plants are closely monitored by the breeder over several years for a variety of desirable traits. (Just imagine that when two humans procreate, every baby the same two humans produce is different. Right? The same is true here.) Those that make the cut are transplanted out to long term fields for continued observations over several more years. The plants may be propagated and then planted at several sites to test their desired traits, growth, cultural habits, fruiting, qualities, etc.  Then if all has been successful, after many years since cross pollination in the greenhouse, that selection may be released for public use or plant patented. Technically, traditional plant breeding is genetically modifying plants (organisms). It is however, not genetically engineering plants-GE (basically something which could never occur naturally- a fish will never make love to a tomato). An unfortunate use of the term GMO, that is now commonplace and causes confusion.

Man, I must have had some good coffee this morning!!!! Oh, wait, I did. Three Peckered Billy Goat. I love Raven’s Brew Whole Bean Coffees. USDA Organic. Roasting facilities: Ketchikan, AK and Tumwater, WA.

Yours in Caffeine-Induced Writing & Gardening,

The Garden Maiden

All images and text copyright 2019 The Garden Maiden
@thegardenmaiden

 

 

 

Categories: Fruit Crops, Research, What's Blooming | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

There is a Fungus Among Us: Fungi in My Mississippi Garden

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One of my favorite pizzas to order just for myself is Fungus Amongus at Tiny Tim’s Pizza on the beautiful square in Fayetteville, Arkansas. GO HOGS! It was a staple during my undergraduate and graduate school years (especially after I met my husband to be), whenever I could afford to eat out. Now, when I make a visit to town and pop up to the square, I head into the West Mountain Brewing Company (connected to Tim’s), belly up to the bar, and order a fresh pint and my favorite pizza. On occasion old friends and UA Alumni stop in to visit and break bread together.  But I digress…

I love mushrooms. My husband does not. A few years ago I purchased some identification books on edible mushrooms to help me out. All That The Rain Promises and More by David Arora and Edible Wild Mushrooms of North America by David W. Fischer and Alan E. Bessette.  Beautiful books.  The problem is that I believe I mostly have NON-EDIBLE fungi in my yard. So those two books are not really the help I need.  Or are they? And well, to be honest, when it comes to harvesting wild and not 100% identified items from the yard to ingest, you don’t want to mess around. The other mushroom book that I have was given to me by someone (let’s be honest, it was my Mom, always thinking of me) who rescued it from the trash dumpster of the grade school in my home town. A nice hardback copy of The Mushroom Handbook by Louis C.D. Krieger, copyright 1967. It has a few color plates, but isn’t exactly laid out in a taxonomic key fashion.

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What I really need is a mushroom class with an expert where I can take notes and photos and become more confident. Then I can reap the rewards of eating what I find, but also being able to correctly identify even the non-edible fungi.

I have a relatively shady yard and garden. Throughout the year I am greeted with a wide array of fungi, or mushrooms of all sorts. I imagine that after dark my garden is filled with pixies and sprites dancing and having a delightful time.

With a few years having passed since my book purchases, I had supposed I would have identified nearly every fungi/mushroom growing on my one acre. I have failed. Therefore I am going to go ahead and start posting photos of what I find! Because either I will eventually get them identified, or someone who sees this will help me out. I still don’t think I would eat anything identified over the internet unless it was by an expert, someone with considerable experience. You know, I just don’t want to spend my mushroom-eating years DEAD. 😉

Photos taken Saturday August 18, 2018. (We had been receiving some rain, finally.) I attempted to take two images of each mushroom for identification, one with side view of caps and one with top view. In some photos I used a garden trowel or my hand for scale.

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Next:

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Next: We have watched squirrels, harvest these and just go to town on them while sitting on our porch. I’m pretty sure it was this one anyway…. I took photos last August, but I’d have to go and dig into my hard drive to be certain. So to quote from one of my favorite movies, “Hey, Dr. Jones, No time for love”.

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Next:

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Next: (I think this is the same species as one of the first sets of images I included)

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Next: (huge! my hand and then my husband’s hand for scale)

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Next:

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Well, that’s it. All of the images here were just in my front yard. I didn’t even make it to the backyard before the next round of rain started.  My location is Mississippi Gulf Coast, about a half hour north of the beach zone, but closer to Louisiana. If that helps with identification.

I found a pretty cool site Saturday:  The Western Pennsylvania Mushroom Club. They had a nice page on species found in Mississippi. I think at least one set of the larger mushrooms are Bolete genus?

So while my husband does not like mushrooms, he does enjoy making pizza, even when I hand him sliced mushrooms for my half. Hopefully someday I will be able to harvest edible wild mushrooms for my own tasty pizza at home.

Your Shroomy Friend!

The Garden Maiden

 

All images and text copyright 2018 The Garden Maiden

Categories: Crazy Plant Things I See, Fungi/Mushrooms/Mycology, Observations from My Garden of Goods & Evils | Tags: , , , , ,
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