Blooming in My Yard: March 8-14, 2014

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

Often times (and sadly so) pulled out or sprayed with herbicide by many folks, this pink-flowering Oxalis wildflower pops up all over my patio garden each spring. I wouldn’t dream of spraying it out (of course I don’t like to spray anything except poison ivy), but I have occasionally moved it to a better home. And guess what? Its edible! I love the blog post on Oxalis written on Eat The Weeds. At any rate, it just started blooming in my garden this week! But in a couple of weeks there will be a plethora of pink flowers. The benefits are that it is very low maintenance, low growing, and will grow in cracks or other hard-to-plant areas.

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

The very first blooms of my rhododendrons have opened. They are a couple of weeks from peak (the perfect time for a garden party), but these blossoms will tease me until then. Remember, if in doubt, just call it a rhododendron, because “All azaleas are rhododendrons but not all rhododendrons are azaleas.” This is because their genus is Rhodendron. Read more about their classification on www.rhododendron.org.  I am so lucky that in times past someone did a wonderful job of planting trees, shrubs, and perennials in my yard. I repay the kindness by planting more as I am able for future homeowners to admire and love.

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

The wild, native Prunus pictured above, likely Prunus serotina (black cherry) is blooming now too. Although this tree is growing on adjacent property, it is full evolved onto my property. However, there are seedlings that pop up everywhere, so I may be inclined this year to dig up a couple and plant out in my yard. Otherwise, they usually end up chopped up with the lawnmower or victim to the compost.  Read Dr. Eric Stafne’s blog post on wild prunus. Look for this tree blooming in the woods on your spring hikes!

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

Last week I showed images from my fruiting pear and one of the pollinator pears. The pollinator image above is my second pollinator pear and just started flowering this week. It is likely a different species, although it does get a bit more shade, both factors that can affect timing of flowering. As with the other pear used for pollinating, it flowers first, then the leaves will emerge.

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

The blueberries are blooming! Both native, such as Vaccinium elliottii, and the cultivated blueberries (above) are flowering. I love their dainty, hanging, bell-like flowers that seem to shimmer in the morning sun. Both are edible! If you are interested in fruit and nut crop information, considering following Dr. Stafne’s blog, which includes information on blueberries. Be on the look for this native blueberry blooming this month if you are out hiking.

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

TheGardenMaiden copyright 2014, Spring blooms in my Mississippi yard

Whew! Can you smell it? Okay, okay, so its not your typical “flower”, but this final gem pictured above is a fungi that emerged near my raised bed. Known commonly as a stinkhorn, I am pretty sure it is of the genus Clathrus. ? Some good information with images can be found on East Tennessee Wildflowers: Fantastic Fungi! This is the second one in my yard this spring.

Its a beautiful day outside and I have a ton of work to do and now half the day is gone from me!

Have a great weekend and try to enjoy some St. Patrick’s Day parades!

Keep Growin’
The Garden Maiden

All images and text copyright 2014 The Garden Maiden

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Categories: What's Blooming | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “Blooming in My Yard: March 8-14, 2014

  1. Pingback: “Ooooh, that smell, the smell of death surrounds you” Clathrus! | The Garden Maiden

  2. i have never heard of this mushroom thing….i am now curious to see and smell one …but you know what they say about curiosity !!! its really ugly. Thanks for the info.

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